Living and Raw Foods web site.  Educating the world about the power of living and raw plant based diet.  This site has the most resources online including articles, recipes, chat, information, personals and more!
 

Click this banner to check it out!
Click here to find out more!

 

HOME
F.A.Q.
REGISTER

MEMBERS
ARTICLES
IN THE NEWS
RECIPES
CHAT

RAWFOODS MAIL
BULLETIN BOARD
CALENDAR

CLASSIFIEDS
COMMUNITY
BOOKSTORE
MARKETPLACE
PERSONALS
RESOURCES

COACHING
CITY GUIDE
MULTIMEDIA
POSTCARDS
SEARCH
GUESTBOOK
LINKING TO US
WHAT'S NEW?
NOTIFY ME!
RELATED LINKS
FEEDBACK/HELP



USA Today Health

10/27/97- Updated 01:05 AM ET

Alternative eating plans

The raw-food diet is only one of several alternatives taking hold in the
USA. But the differences can be confusing. Barbara Haspel, co-author
of the healthy eating newsletter Dreaded Broccoli, distinguishes the
diets:

Ovo-lacto vegetarian. "The standard-issue vegetarian," she says.
They eat no meat, and usually no fish, but they do eat animal products
like eggs, cheese and other dairy foods. "In other words," Haspel says,
"if something had to die to produce it, they don't eat it. But they do eat
things that are produced by living animals."

Vegans. They consume no foods produced by any animals, Haspel
says. That means no meat, no dairy, no eggs, not even honey. "Some
undertake the vegan diet for health reasons, some for moral reasons
because they don't believe in having slave animals."

Fruitarians. An offshoot of the raw-food diet, and even more of a
niche, Haspel says. Like rawists, fruitarians eat only fruits and
vegetables that are botanically considered fruits, such as green peppers
and tomatoes. "Fruitarians believe you should only eat plants that
spread their seeds through being consumed." For example, digging up a
root vegetable violates the plant's integrity. "To eat an apple, however,
scattering the seeds far from the tree, is to make a contribution to the
plant's ecology."

Macrobiotics. It's a Zen thing, Haspel says. "And it's based on the
need to keep the principles of yin and yang, the ancient Chinese theory
of contrary forces, in balance in our bodies." The guidelines to the
macrobiotic diet are pretty flexible, she says, but generally consist of
50% brown rice, "the food that perfectly balances yin and yang," 20%
beans and 30% leafy green vegetables, including some seaweed.

By Cathy Hainer, USA TODAY

 

 

Navigate Living and Raw Foods below:

Search Living and Raw Foods below:

Translate this site into:

Search Amazon.com for:

Eat more raw fruits and vegetables

Living and Raw Foods Button
1998 Living-Foods.com
All Rights Reserved

USE OF THIS SITE SIGNIFIES YOUR AGREEMENT TO THE DISCLAIMER.

Privacy Policy Statement

Eat more Raw Fruits and Vegetables